Saturday, 14 March 2015

Did you have a good day?

I decided to write this post as a Mummy of a little boy who is on the Autism Spectrum and has very limited speech and understanding, I wanted to give a glimpse into our world.

He had been for a school trip to a small local airport and this is the story of collection and journey home....

As I walked through the door I almost heard the sigh of relief from the teachers, "Mummy is here" was said in that slightly high pitched tone mixing happy and stress all at the same time. OB runs towards me shouting Mummy then collapsed on the floor just by my feet telling me "I want yo see animals and go to Legoland". OK I think to myself here we go, I bent down to his level and said in that slight high pitched fake happy tone that it was time to get into Mummy's car, but he was getting distressed the word Lego was being said repeatedly. I noted he did not have his Lego (Lego goes everywhere with him) I enquired about said Lego, luckily it was quickly found, this seemed to calm for at least two mins. His TA and I took this opportunity grab a hand each as we walk him to the car. He is just saying Legoland and animals at this time while I am informed he did a lot of walking and ate two chicken goujons.

We get into the car, our routine of every car trip starts with him getting in the front seat, he changes the radio to disk and then selects track five from the frozen soundtrack and sits down his seat. As I buckle his seat belt and gave him a kiss on the cheek I ask him if he had a nice day he responded with I go to legoland.

I sit down in in the front seat and take a deep breath, as I am trying to set up the SatNav all I hear  is Mummy lets leave, Mummy go, this gets louder to an almost scream as I tried my hardest to get the SatNav working my stupid fingers unable to hit the right buttons. Finally we stared our journey home, I again asked how his day was, I know to ask short to the point questions, did you see a fire engine, did you see an aeroplane nothing just silence filled the car as track five came to an end the only words I hear are again again.

As we came to the traffic lights we had a melt down over the fact they were red and we could not move, I gave him my phone as we had a melt down over the light being green and he wanted the lights to be red again, big tears falling down his cheeks. As he finds his favourite song on spotify, gravity belts throughout the car, he still knows exactly when tack five has finished again again echoes out for the second time.

I decided to ask about his day one last time as we got closer to home, I got "I go to Legoland I go to Legoland" and nothing else. The only time I got anything more was when we he realised we were going home, then the demands for Legoland got more and more by the time we made it to the front door and I went to undo his seat belt, huge tears were falling down his face as he shouts for Legoland got louder and louder. I wrap my arms around him and pick him up he collapses in my arms sobbing and repeating legoland.

This is all I know about his day, when in the safety of the house and settled I asked again this time I got are are you crazy mummy with a huge smile and asked me to turn the TV over as "I don't like this one"......

As we are all aware Autism is a huge spectrum but I hope sharing this will help to give an idea about our life raising a child on the spectrum.  After speaking with his teachers I find out he was well behaved and they were very proud of him, he walked with the other children and sat while a talk took place, this would not have happened two months ago. My boy did well and apparently had a great time, thanks for the teachers for sitting me down to tell me this it means a lot.

The Dad Network
>br /> >br />
Running in Lavender


“Our


Brilliant blog posts on HonestMum.com

16 comments:

  1. Oh my dear, I have no words for you really. I have spent most of my career working with children with Autism and you're right it's such a large spectrum. But I also know that at the same time that I can't fully know what it's like. This post does that. I hope others will read it and find comfort. Am glad you asked the teachers too...It must have offered a lot of relief to you to know how well behaved and how much fun he had.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Martyn, it seems to be a popular post, it's one of those things I had to do. He is an amazing little boy who finds life tough sometimes but on the flip side is happy in his world and we make sure he is secure and has the routine he needs x

      Delete
  2. Thank you for sharing this glimpse into your world. I have no personal experience of Autism so I can't even begin to imagine how any of this must feel, I can only send you my heartfelt wishes from one mum to another and hope things get easier for you.

    Kate x

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you Kate! it's a world we never knew about and we are slowly starting to understand. life is slowely becoming easier and his speech is increasing. Your kind words are appreciated xxx

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm also one who has no first-hand experience of Autism, but your post certainly paints a vivid picture. I now understand a bit more why you need the other pursuits (mud, cakes and wine) to keep you sane. I hope to be able to help a bit by exchanging gardening info with you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mark thank you, your right i find the garden a total distraction from everything else and a glass if wine helps. I love your blog and reading what your upto and really enjoy our chats and your knowledge sharing x

      Delete
  5. This sounds so very very familiar. I am a learning assistant in a school for special needs children. I have 6 autistic boys in my class and I can imagine life at home is a mixture of very tough times, and very loving proud times. Thank you for sharing and raising awareness. Sending love to you both, #SundayStars.
    Amanda. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Amanda, your very right some real lows but some huge highs and a sense of pride in our little boy. I hope this just gives a small insight into our lives xx

      Delete
  6. My stepson is on the spectrum, not as far as your's but enough to make every day more challenging. The most annoying thing is to the naked eye people on the spectrum look the same.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very true, it's so hidden and misunderstood

      Delete
  7. gosh this sounds tough, its really interesting to be given a glimpse into your everyday life thanks so much for sharing and linking up to #sundaystars

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Amy! can be hard work esp the non response as you find out nothing. But I promise we have some real fun time too xxx

      Delete
  8. I have to smile reading this, finally I have found someone who has the same problem with traffic lights as us! Traffic lights, or anything that stops the car moving, causes major meltdowns in our car. I have to laugh other wise I would cry! I hate autism and the lack of words, and not being able to share or get excited about experiences. It breaks my heart x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thank you for your comment, Autism is very hard to deal with and as with the traffic lights you can not win. Its the strange world of silence that feels normal to us xxx

      Delete
  9. You're spot on with the repitition and the fixations that autism presents our children with. It's so difficult to manage at times and so rewarding at others.
    Thanks for linking up with #SSAmazingAchievements

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much and so pleased your liked the post, I hope in a small way we can bring light into the world of autism xx

      Delete