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Planting Climbers

Mr MC&W and I are sat on the sofa with a cup of tea, completely shattered and our muscles are aching, however, we are really rather pleased with ourselves. This morning, through torrential downpours, bright sunshine and a rather cold wind Mr MC&W and I planted 18 climbers.

We wanted to add some colour to the fence behind the trees but not to over crowd them. I thought that some climbers would be perfect, they would add interest and attract bees and wildlife.  

This is what we went for:

Lonicera Japonica Hallina -Late Dutch Honeysuckle, 

Trachelospermum Jasminoides - Confederate Jasmin 

Clematis Montana Tetrarose 

In theory, we should get flowers for a lot of the year, Viburnum (the smaller trees and three shrubs) flower in the winter, Clematis Tetrarose is an early spring flowering clematis, honeysuckle late spring to early summer and Jasmin mid to late summer. Bringing this together with the Elaeagnus Ebbingei, the large Lollipop trees at the back that flower during the summer months.

The Jasmin is an evergreen though the leaves turn a bronze red colour in the winter combined with the honeysuckle which I have done reading up about, some say its evergreen and some say it can lose some of its leaves. We will have to wait and see. However, I can say for certain that the clematis is deciduous and will lose its leaves.

This is how we planned it, we have six fence panels so we have one of each plant on each panel. The theory is they climb in and out of the fence and each other.


TetraRose, Honeysuckle and Jasmin

We started off badly, the first honeysuckle was impossible to untangle from the bamboo cane, we thought the job was going to take hours and we were in over our heads. We decided to try another one turns out we had picked the worst one, the next one we managed to plant and untangle and tie against the fence quick and easy.



Untangling the climbers
By the end had a good little system working, Mr MC&W digging the holes, me planting then working together to untangle, arrange and tie against the fence. The clematis we were convinced we would break anytime we handled them, the stems were so delicate.

A good water later and the plants were in. It was great to do this job ourselves, though we learnt a few lessons. Do not look up when untangling as the bits fall into your eyes, cut the twine before you need it and do not render your secateurs useless as you have nothing else to cut the bamboo canes with. As you can see we have a lot to learn.

I can not wait to see how they develop and the fantastic smelling flowers.



Cuddle Fairy
DIY Daddy Blog

Comments

  1. Goodness, you have been busy! What clever ideas. I love that the climber type of plants give you that added layer of privacy and green. Jasmin sounds wonderful, I need to look into this for our garden. #BloggerClubUK

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  2. I do colour in the garden. We have a lovely rose garden in bloom at the moment and it's beautiful. You've done a great job. I bet yours will look and smell lovely once it's all established #ThatFridayLinky

    It won't allow me to add my details but i'm Lisa from It's a Blogs Life x

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  3. It looks like you have given the plants a lovely home (with the fence to climb!). I imagine that area will look and smell amazing next year once the plants are all established.

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  4. I love it! Such great ideas! I'm terrible with gardening. I use starter plants and still kill them before I even get them in the ground. LOL! #thatfridaylinky

    ReplyDelete
  5. Love this your garden looks amazing Thanks for linking to the #THAT FRIDAY LINKY come back next week please

    ReplyDelete
  6. So pretty and peaceful!

    #stayclassymama

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love climbers, they look really pretty when they're in full bloom! Thanks so much for sharing with #Blogstravaganza xx

    ReplyDelete
  8. we have roses climbing up the front of our house and they are lovely except for the thorns! #blogstravaganza

    ReplyDelete

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